1956 Aero Caproni Capriolo 75 Corsa 1956 Aero Caproni Capriolo 75 Corsa 1956 Aero Caproni Capriolo 75 Corsa 1956 Aero Caproni Capriolo 75 Corsa 1956 Aero Caproni Capriolo 75 Corsa 1956 Aero Caproni Capriolo 75 Corsa 1956 Aero Caproni Capriolo 75 Corsa 1956 Aero Caproni Capriolo 75 Corsa 1956 Aero Caproni Capriolo 75 Corsa 1956 Aero Caproni Capriolo 75 Corsa 1956 Aero Caproni Capriolo 75 Corsa 1956 Aero Caproni Capriolo 75 Corsa 1956 Aero Caproni Capriolo 75 Corsa 1956 Aero Caproni Capriolo 75 Corsa 1956 Aero Caproni Capriolo 75 Corsa 1956 Aero Caproni Capriolo 75 Corsa

1956 Aero Caproni Capriolo 75 Corsa

Aero Caproni Capriolo 75 Corsa

  • 1956
  • 0 km
  • Restored
  • EU title
  • EU taxes paid
  • Sold

This beautifully restored Capriolo 75 Monoalbero Corsa senza fanale, single camshaft racer lacks nothing. It's quite stunning from every angle.

For 1955 Aero Caproni offered a 75cc over-the-counter racer for privateers, developed directly from Claudio Galliani's 1954 Milano-Taranto-winning works bike.

Italian regulations for the domestic Formula Sport class stipulated that machines should have only a single camshaft and four gears, and so the monoalbero single-camshaft racer was born.

Bore and stroke are 47.4 x 43 mm and the motor breathes via a 19mm Dell'Orto racing carburettor, eventually producing a maximum of almost 8 bhp.

The cycle parts were virtually an exact copy of the 1954 works bikes', featuring a pressed-steel frame and swinging-arm, telescopic front fork with hydraulic damping, and dual shock rear suspension.

Front-brakes were full-width aluminium-alloy 180mm diameter and 120mm half-width at the rear. Dry weight was 68kg and the top speed over 100km/h.

Because Italy's long-distance road races, such as the Moto Giro d'Italia and Milan-Taranto required that machines be street legal and possess lights, a flywheel generator was fitted.

The Corsa remained in production until 1958 and offered privateers a competitive ride in the 75cc class for many years.

In 1951, Aero Caproni produced a 75cc single cylinder with an unusual valve control. A king shaft led from the crankshaft to the cylinder head via bevel gears, but did not drive a conventional camshaft. At its upper end, there was a cam disk.

A disk with two concentric circular paths with elevations which functioned as cams and actuated the valves arranged in a V-shape in the hemispherical combustion chambers via two rocker arms.

This system had already been used by Richard Küchen in his K-engine and at Chater Lea in England.

The 75 Series single cylinder of the first series not only had this unusual valve control, but a four-speed geared transmission coupled with a drag and an unusual rear wheel suspension.

A stop on the swing arm was acting on the encapsulated springs under the engine. Friction dampers controlled the frame. The second series had conventional spring struts.

In addition to the valve control, unusual solutions were also found in the engine. With a trick, the connecting rod of the one-piece, longitudinally arranged crankshaft was mounted.

The cylindrical rollers between the connecting rod and the crankpin could be inserted through a groove with a screwed-in fitting. After disassembling the rollers, the connecting rod could be stripped over the crankshaft.

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